What Every Woman Should Know About Birth Control

18 Apr 2006
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Things Every Woman Should Know About Birth Control Excerpted from the Hopkins Health Watch columns and interviews originally published in the John R. Lee, M.D. Medical Letter Even the Low Dose Pill is Dangerous There have been a series of reports in the media lately to the effect that the newer low-dose birth control pills are “safe.” While it’s true that they’re safer than the old higher dose pills they are still very dangerous. Most of them are made either with just a testosterone-like progestin called 19-nor-testosterone, or a progestin and a small amount of estrogen. That means just for starters that you’re getting dosed with a progestin every month,.

Raloxifene for Breast Cancer Prevention: An NWHN Analysis

18 Apr 2006
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National Women’s Health Network: April 18, 2006 Yesterday, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) announced preliminary results from STAR, a large clinical trial comparing the effect of raloxifene and tamoxifen on risk of developing breast cancer in postmenopausal women who were considered to be at higher than average risk. The trial was funded by the NCI and Eli Lilly, manufacturer of raloxifene, which is currently marketed under the brand name Evista for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. According to the NCI, both drugs cut the number of new cases of breast cancer in half, but women taking raloxifene experienced fewer serious side effects such as blood clots and cancer of the.

Paget’s Disease of the Breast

12 Apr 2006
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Paget’s disease of the nipple is a form of breast cancer, that, in about one-half of patients there will be a mass deeper within the breast. There is a red, oozing, crusting or scaling nipple lesion (often mistaken for eczema) that does not respond to conservative therapy (topical steroid and antibiotics) should be biopsied.

Estrogen Therapy Boosts Clotting Risk in Postmenopausal Women

12 Apr 2006
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MONDAY, April 10, 2006 (HealthDay News) — Estrogen therapy appears to increase the risk of blood clots in the veins of postmenopausal women who have had their uterus removed. These latest results from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) were unexpected, even to the study’s lead author. “It surprised us all how few benefits have come out of this and how many negatives,” said Dr. J. David Curb, a professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Hawaii and president/director of the Pacific Health Research Institute, both in Honolulu. “This is not where I would have predicted we would be. I was a believer [that estrogen would not increase the risk.

The Effects of Induced Menopause

12 Apr 2006
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The term induced menopause describes menopause caused by a medical intervention. Although certain drug or radiation therapies that damage the ovaries can cause induced menopause, the most common cause is surgical removal of both ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy). Women who experience surgical menopause dont slowly work their way through the typically gradual transition of perimenopause. With surgical menopause, menopause occurs immediately on the day of surgery. With induced menopause caused by medical treatments, there may be a short transition as damaged ovaries shut down production of hormones over a period of time. Induced menopause can occur at any age after puberty and before natural, spontaneous menopause occurs. And just as the.

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